African-American Community Quotes

African-American Community Quotes by Ana Navarro, J. C. Watts, Byron Allen, Anita Hill, Lizz Wright, Ziggy Marley and many others.

For too long, I think the African-American community has been taken for granted by one party and completely ignored by the other. It is not acceptable. It’s not good for the parties, for the country, or for the community.
There’s a whole lot more to the African-American community than entertainment and sports.
At the very least, you must make the Internet free in areas that are poverty-stricken. Without the Internet and access to information, poverty-stricken households will never catch up to households above the poverty linethrowing the African-American community deeper into the stone ages.
I think, though, as African-American women, we are always trained to value our community even at the expense of ourselves, and so we attempt to protect the African-American community.
A lot of people in the African-American community are raised by grandmothers, and that relationship is a special bond and circle.
The African-American community still needs to come together as one and stand up for rights of the people and of what’s happening in their culture, their community.
My company, Cinema Gypsy, produced a podcast, ‘Bronzeville,’ in conjunction with Larenz Tate and his brothers that we’re developing into a television show. It deals with a very tight-knit African-American community in Chicago in 1947 and people who run a numbers wheel.
We are carrying collectively a lot of trauma, especially those of us in the African-American community. And if we’re not careful, it’ll overtake us, and we’ll self-destruct.
I guess probably in my time in politics, it continued to be affirmed to me that the African-American community, despite being subscription television’s most valuable customers, they are very underserved by cable and satellite television programming options.
I think there’s a lot of things that occur within the African-American community, that we would prefer to stay within the African-American community – that we get a little nervous when you start having scenes or dialogue that we know is going to be viewed and heard on a national or global scale.
Branding says a lot about luxury and about exclusion and about the choices that manufacturers make, but I think that what society does with it after it’s produced is something else. And the African-American community has always been expert at taking things and repurposing them toward their own ends.
I am committed to ensure that our 2008 Republican presidential candidates forthrightly address issues of importance to the African-American community.
Antoine ‘FatsDomino was a 1950s rock n’ roll pioneer, a larger-than-life New Orleans figure, and a role model for the African-American community in a time of deep segregation.
My dad‘s entire business and enterprises have been about helping the African-American community.
We need to have law enforcement and the African-American community work together for the safety of everybody.
‘The Firebird’ just symbolizes a lot for me and my career. It was one of the first really big principal roles that I was ever given an opportunity to dance with American Ballet Theatre, and it was a huge step for the African-American community, I think, within the classical ballet world.
My father had the main barber- and beauty-supply business in the African-American community in Buffalo.
In the African-American community, we struggle with a lot of health problems that have a lot to do with our diet.
I think O. J. Simpson was a very prominent figure in the African-American community. He was sort of a manifestation of the American dream: ‘If it can happen for him, it can happen for me.’
Every decent person feels the pain of the African-American community, but I also don’t want to pretend like I know the exact distinct pain.
We can revolutionize the attitude of inner city brown and black kids to learning. We need a civil rights movement within the African-American community.
More than 72 percent of children in the African-American community are born out of wedlock. That means absent fathers.
In the white community, the path to a more perfect union means acknowledging that what ails the African-American community does not just exist in the minds of black people; that the legacy of discrimination – and current incidents of discrimination, while less overt than in the past – are real and must be addressed.
The only reason I’ve been so critical of hip-hop is because I’ve always been aware of the effect that it has, and the reflection that it gives of the African-American community.
The Jewish culture has a wonderful thing about education. It has a great thing about family; it has a great thing about unity, hard work, dedication. I would like to say the African-American community should emulate that.